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Simon Evans

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Simon Evans

‘He’s a rat’, ‘I smell a rat’, ‘life’s a rat race’. It’s clear that rats are not all too highly esteemed by us humans. This despite that fact the rats make a good substitute for human beings as laboratory animals for testing medicines. In Companion Simon Evans couples short texts with rat body parts. By referring to human characteristics in the texts we experience the rat as not so very different from ourselves.

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Adam Zaretsky

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Adam Zaretsky

Bio artist Adam Zaretsky constantly finds himself on the edge of the legally permissible. His Errorarium, for example, is home to zebra fish embryos injected with algae. The aim is that these embryos grow up to be completely self-sustaining fish and that they can make food from sunlight just as plants do. This could be the beginning of something much bigger. Imagine that humans can some day live by sunlight alone … Would you like to get closer to Zaretsky’s unusual creations? Turn on the light- and sound switches and you can make contact with the zebra fish.
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Antti Laitinen

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Antti Laitinen

‘Look for the simple bare necessities.’ This sentence seems particularly apropos today. Everyone seems to want to ‘go back to basics’, and where is that more possible than in ‘unspoiled nature’? In his own Bare Necessities the Finnish artist Antti Laitinen puts the idea of going back to basics to the test. He goes into the wild without supplies. You see him clumsily trying to pick up ants to eat, catch fish with a self-made spear, make a fire by rubbing two sticks together and to sleep in a bed he made from moss. Laitinen clearly questions the romantic ideal of ‘going back’ to nature.

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Jimmie Durham

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Jimmie Durham

Are we looking at archaeological finds or just the contents of someone’s junk box? With Jimmie Durham you never know. People familiar with his work know that the ‘things’ he presents trigger associations that first evoke one thing and later another. This ‘uncertainty’ pushes us to look a little more closely. His way of working enables him to not only free things from their usual function, but also delivers those who are open to it from their preconceptions.

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Ursula Biemann

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Ursula Biemann

In Egypt the Nile determines where it is possible to live and where not. It displaces families living on its banks, but it also fertilizes the soil. Living on land along the Nile is both attractive and difficult. In her installation Egyptian Chemistry Swiss artist Ursula Biemann shows how natural and technical circumstances influence all aspects of the lives of the population. The videos tell the stories of local farmers, engineers and environmental activists, while water samples reveal local water contamination. For as long as people in Egypt can remember, culture and nature have been two sides of the same coin.

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Hans Scholten

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Hans Scholten

When we look at the photos of Hans Scholten, we quickly notice how rapidly growing metropolises resemble wild growth in nature. Scholten captures burgeoning urban neighbourhoods where in the absence of any form of organised urban planning chaos and anarchy seem to take the upper hand. In some cities the uncontrolled tempo leads to construction of such poor quality that decay sets in almost immediately. In other cities inhabitants find ways to positively influence their environment. Should we be making plans for some kind of orderly urban development for the rapidly growing world population? Are we up to this task?

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Lucinda Devlin

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Lucinda Devlin

QUONSET, MONTANA, 2009, TURBINE ENTRANCE, EARL PARK, INDIANA, 2009 & WIND TURBINE / SOYBEANS, EARL PARK, INDIANA, 2008*

Do you ever dream about living a romantic life on a farm in the countryside? The photo series Field Culture van Lucinda Devlin reveals what modern farming really looks like: a world of high tech machines, wind turbines, genetics and biological pesticides. Our romantic ideal of country life appears to have been outstripped by time and replaced by a smoothly operating agrarian machine.

* from the series Field Culture, courtesy Galerie m Bochum, Germany, 2009

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Matthijs de Bruijne

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Matthijs de Bruijne

Matthijs de Bruijne was puzzled by the dramatic increase in poverty in the Tucumàn region of Northern Argentina after reforms took effect in 1966. He travelled to the area and discovered that the once-independent sugar cane farmers had become wage slaves of multinationals that introduced so-called cash crops to the region (such as genetically modified soy beans). A local initiative to set up a soup kitchen offered a measure of relief. De Bruijne documented this hopeful development in 2003. The photographer returned to the area only to discover that circumstances had become even more desperate – once again through external intervention. The installation ‘Naturalized Poverty’ is the result.

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Simon Starling

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Simon Starling

Did you know that rhododendrons are politically sensitive plants in Scotland? The Scottish government has designated various ‘pure zones’ where only plant species that are originally Scottish are allowed to grow. Despite the fact that the rhododendron was introduced in Scotland in 1763, it is originally a Spanish plant and ‘thus’ must be eradicated. Artist Simon Starling gives the rhododendron a safe haven on his Island of Weeds, raising the question of when you can call yourself ‘Scottish’ anyway.

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Phylida Barlow

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Phylida Barlow

Balconies often evoke associations of freedom. It’s a sunny day, you’re relaxed, wearing your most comfortable clothing and gazing out over the sea. On the crumbling ‘balconies’ of Phylida Barlow it’s as if you’ve been daydreaming too long, and are unable to come downstairs as the foundations fall apart beneath you. Is this a metaphor for the human illusion of freedom being rudely interrupted now that we are running out of resources? Or is it a metaphor for the distance with which we see this happening, as if it has nothing to do with us?

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Luuk Wilmering

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Luuk Wilmering

In Luuk Wilmering’s series Lost, Birds Needs Shelter (Scientist), the scientist has literally lost her way. The work consists of a kind of archive card with photos of birds. The cards have not been filled in. You ask yourself at first if you are looking at newly discovered bird species that have yet to be categorised. When you look more closely, you see that these birds belonged to species that are now extinct. Too late for categorisation.

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Persijn Broersen and Margit Lukács

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Persijn Broersen and Margit Lukács

Go ahead and confess. When you imagine paradise, don’t you se a beautiful garden with luxuriant flowers and soft, furry rabbits hopping around? In Mastering Bambi (2010) the Dutch artist duo Persijn Broersen and Margit Lukács remind us that this image is no more than a mirage. In their video the cute images of the original Bambi film have been removed, and the landscape images that remain appear to have been placed one after the other in a never-ending peepshow. While the artists show a world that has clearly been staged, the threat that this poses feels very real nonetheless.

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Mark Dion

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Mark Dion

For his Wilderness Units Mark Dion placed buffalos, plants and, as here, a wolf on trailers. This feels strange, but it is the way natural history museums around the world have displayed wild animals by the hundreds, if not thousands. Apparently nature has to be manipulated (even killed) before we can observe it. And the manoeuvrable trailer? Could the trailer be a symbol for the way we casually set ‘nature’ aside as an object, according to definitions that are convenient to us at any given time? Just so we can stay in control?

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Peter Fend

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Peter Fend

‘A mix of conceptual art, activism and entrepreneurship, in which art is used to solve environmental problems’, is the way The New York Times described Peter Fend’s work. In Biojetful Holland this American artist proposes that the Netherlands be the first country to allow its largest airport to run on renewable energy. The necessary biogas could be generated from excess water plants and algae growing in Dutch rivers, channels and canals. Talk about the sky being the limit …

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Roy Villevoye

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Roy Villevoye

Death comes into our living rooms so often via news images on television and in newspapers that we seem to have closed ourselves off from it. Roy Villevoye grabs us by the throat with two dead bodies in The Clearing. The artist and his friend from Asmat, New Guinea modelled for this realistic sculpture. Is this about a racial conflict that got out of hand? Or were both attacked by someone else? A force that transcends personal and cultural differences?

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Egied Simons

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Egied Simons

Thanks to Egied Simons, biologists are no longer the only ones able to see microscopically small insect eggs or the infinitely small beating hearts of snail embryos. Simons brings the miniature life that exists in ponds, between paving stones, on walls and in the air close by. ‘Magnification makes small tangible, instantly endowing it with significance and emotion’, says Simons.

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Francis Alÿs

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Francis Alÿs

The fascinating feature of a tornado is that it is dead-still in the eye. Belgian-Mexican artist Francis Alÿs spent ten years following tornados as a bona fide Tornado-chaser for the project Tornado. Despite repeated warnings, he took many risks. He allowed himself to be engulfed by this natural phenomen. The tornado as metaphor for the Mexican political situation? For life itself? It doesn’t seem to matter to Alÿs. It is primarily the balance between opposing forces in this phenomen that intrigues him.

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Matt Mullican

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Matt Mullican

Matt Mullican has been working almost obsessively since the eighties on a system of pictograms and colour codes that together aim to depict the cosmos. Untitled (Elements) is a literal rendition of this enormous ambition. In Mullican’s system the colour green relates primarily to the elements earth, water, air and fire, but also to hell and death. The colour black relates among other things to ‘language’ as a tool for representation. Mullican’s work is not the first of its kind, but joins a long tradition of artists and scientists who have attempted to map the universe,

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Ursula Biemann

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Ursula Biemann

In Egypt the Nile determines where it is possible to live and where not. It displaces families living on its banks, but it also fertilizes the soil. Living on land along the Nile is both attractive and difficult. In her installation Egyptian Chemistry Swiss artist Ursula Biemann shows how natural and technical circumstances influence all aspects of the lives of the population. The videos tell the stories of local farmers, engineers and environmental activists, while water samples reveal local water contamination. For as long as people in Egypt can remember, culture and nature have been two sides of the same coin.

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Pierre Huyghe

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Pierre Huyghe

The aquarium in Pierre Huyghe’s Zoodram 4 is really a theatre in which the hermit crab plays the leading role. While the artist has carefully assembled the décor of plants, insects, crab and Japanese mask, for the rest he allows nature to ‘take its course.’ In this way all sorts of unexpected partnerships arise. You can see in Zoodram 4, for example, how the hermit crab puts on the mask as its new house.

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Olivier Darné

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Olivier Darné

No more jam on bread, coffee at breakfast and no orchids on the window sill; just a few of the consequences if we don’t act now to save the honey bee from extinction. Did you know thirty percent of what we eat is dependent on pollination? The Honey Bank commissioned by Stroom Den Haag offers everyone an opportunity to do something concrete by investing. Yes Naturally set an example and became a shareholder. Starting in May, Darne’s City Pollinator will be set up in the city centre of The Haque – beehives purchased with shareholders’ money that will shore up the bee population considerably.

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Olafur Eliasson

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Olafur Eliasson

It is almost inevitable that growing up in rugged Iceland would make the Danish artist Olafur Eliasson more sensitive to the changeability of life. The beauty of the installation Introvert Sun causes us in first instance to muse about the sun as a source of life. But why the title ‘Introvert’ Sun? Eliasson forces us to see what is actually going on. This mighty heavenly body is heating up and will over the course of time explode. The very thing that is the source of all existence since time began will also cause our complete annihilation.

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Tinkebell

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Tinkebell

ON AMY TAXIDERMY … FROM A TRUE FAN

The American Amy was thirteen when she started to stuff dead animals that she found along the road and on EBay. It was a small step to hunting squirrels and later possums, fox and deer. Tinkebell has been following the travails of Amy for the past ten years. A true fan, Tinkebell buys an animal every year. Her fascination has resulted in a book and installation that reminds us that we are all implicated in killing animals. Even if only by eating meat and wearing leather.

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Erik Kessels

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Erik Kessels

Erik Kessels uses a humoristic reversed-world-perspective to reveal the human-animal relationship. He orders found photo’s in a specific way and plays with conventions and habits. In Almost Every Picture number 10 the main character is a piglet. The piglet that is served in the restaurant is not to be eaten. On the contrary: the piglet is being idolised. The host keeps pigs and they lead a wonderful life before they get old and being eaten.

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Raul Ortega Ayala

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Raul Ortega Ayala

Mexican artist Raul Ortega Ayala knows more than most people about the politics of food. He has been studying the many ins and outs of this daily necessity with an anthropologist’s intensity for years. Babel Fat Tower is just one of the more poetic results of his research. This tower made from animal fat is a replica of the tower in Pieter Breughel’s famous painting The Tower of Babel, painted in 1565. The warmth of the lamp will cause the tower to slowly melt away during the course of the exhibition. With this biblical symbolism of progress and decay Babel Fat Tower strikes a sensitive chord in the context of global food politics.

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Keith Edmier

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Keith Edmier

Victoria Regia (First Night Bloom)   Larger than life is the first description that springs to mind when you see the sculptures of Keith Edmier (1967). The ‘sur-real’ character of Victoria Regia (First Night Bloom) goes beyond the stunning, brightly coloured exterior. When in bloom this water lily transforms itself in 24 hours from female to male. Edmier jars us a step further out of our mental boxes by putting real pollen on the polyester flowers.  Polyester resin, silicone rubber, acrylic, polyurethane, pollen and steel, courtesy of the artist, AkzoNobel Art Foundation, 1998

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Tea Mäkipää

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Tea Mäkipää

Petrol Engine Memorial Park
Is a future without polluting automobile traffic possible? The overgrown cars from the Petrol Engine Memorial Park by Tea Mäkipää give us a glimpse into this ‘suspected’ utopia. At night they bring a noisy ode to days gone by with their horns. The romance of ‘a rumbling engine, a good whiff of diesel and a race along the highway’ is something we may look back on with nostalgia.

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Ton Matton

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Ton Matton

Give your tired houseplants the environment they deserve in the Plants Liberation Forest by urban designer Ton Matton. Heat lamps, fans and an ‘intravenous’ water system create a ‘wellness centre’ for plants. The liberation forest is not only designed to give houseplants an escape. By turning off the luxury items you carry with you as you stroll through the plants forest, you too can take a break from everyday life in Matton’s ‘Utopia Room’.

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Michiel Schwarz Joost Elffers

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Michiel Schwarz Joost Elffers

‘Less is more’ said the modernists. ‘Do more with less’, say the sustainists. Michiel Schwarz and Joost Elffers proclaim a new age in their manifesto ‘Sustainism is the New Modernism’. They envision a world in which we discover new digital possibilities, in which we’re more connected to each other, but at the same time more focused on our local environments. The manifesto is accompanied by a series of unique symbols, three of which can be seen on the front of the GEM building.

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Maartje Korstanje

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Maartje Korstanje

‘Strips of wood covered with something slimy’ is a description that comes closest to capturing the sculptures of Maartje Korstanje in words. She achieves their ‘natural’ appearance, remarkably enough, by using refuse materials like cardboard, rope and plastic. Some people see imaginary animals in the sculptures; others associate the images with intestines and other innards. One thing is certain, appearances can be deceiving!

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Maarten vanden Eynde

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Maarten vanden Eynde

Plastic is seen as a cheap disposable material. Because it’s one of the few materials that does not decompose, it will be very costly to us in the long run. Plastic refuse largely ends up in ocean currents, where it eventually joins the so-called ‘plastic soup.’ Maarten Vanden Eynde presents himself as an ‘ocean comber’ and fishes enormous amounts of plastic from the sea to make large coral reefs.

Jim Holyoak & Matt Shane @ MAC 2011

Jim Holyoak and Matt Shane

  • Jim Holyoak & Matt Shane @ MAC 2011

  • Jim Holyoak & Matt Shane @ MAC 2011

Jim Holyoak and Matt Shane

In parallel to our solo practices, we (Matt Shane and Jim Holyoak) have been drawing together for thirteen years. Our most recent collaborative project is entitled Quagmire, and is currently on display at the GEM. Quagmire represents a place where our interests intersect. Shane’s solo work is primarily focused on urban / industrial encroachment and ghost towns, while Holyoak’s work is concerned with paleontology and monsters. Our shared world is one at the borderlands of wilderness and civilization, the real and the imaginary, deep time and the present. We are intrigued by collaborative art because it complicates individual patterns of art making, and also for its visual documentation of relationships, blurring together the seams between art and life.
Quagmire was originally created for the Triennale québécoise, in the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal. There, we drew on-site for several months, at night while the museum was closed to the public. A camera was set up to take photos at various intervals, resulting in a stop-motion animation that documented our nocturnal activities: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2EgCfb8bq0

In Quagmire, we have represented the swamp as a metaphorical site of disintegration and formlessness, but also of abundant life and regeneration. A swamp is in a constant state of digesting itself. Our mire-home depicts mangrove roots, vines, mud, bulrushes and lilies, as well as entire cities growing on the skin of a dead sperm whale. A ‘quagmire’ can also refer to a difficult or precarious situation. It is an apt metaphor for the situation we find ourselves in as a species, dependent on the fossilized remains of an unfathomable, ancient, swamp world. This swamp-world was the Carboniferous period of geologic time, 354 million – 286 million years ago, also known as the ‘Coal Age.’ On land, the Carboniferous was the age of insects, ferns, and amphibians. Although trees had yet to evolve, there was 40% more oxygen than today. The swamp forests consisted of giant ferns, where dragonflies flew on meter-wide wingspans. The coal we now burn is the fossilized remains of these forests. Carbon, after which the period was named, constitutes both the material we use to draw (ink, graphite and charcoal) and the basis of all living organisms.
This summer, we will return to The Hague and work on-site in the GEM, transforming Quagmire with drawings of other animals, landscapes, organs and weather, examining this convergence of the Carboniferous with the Anthropocene.

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Hilarius Hofstede

Hilarius Hofstede

‘Paleo Psycho Pop’ is Hilarius Hofstede’s favourite characterisation of his work. He makes art by bringing together pop culture, mythology and nature. In Into the Wild/ Cherchez la truffe he does this by combining boar heads with a motorcycle. Ready to search for wild truffles, the stuffed boars are assisted by the power of the machine. Has wild nature become a luxury item?

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Ai Wei Wei

Ai Wei Wei

‘Too little oil for the world population’, proclaimed a recent newspaper headline. But is this true? Or do we waste and mismanage the oil that is available to us? Oil Spills by Ai Weiwei concerns these and other important questions. His oil spills are made of porcelain, called china in English. This is a direct allusion to his own country, an upcoming world economy that is rapidly becoming very dependent on oil. A natural resource that is becoming ever scarcer as demand for it grows. This means not only that the price of oil will continue to increase, but also that nations or other groups of people will not refrain from waging devastating warfare over access to it.

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Complete list of artists

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Complete list of artists

2012 Architecten, Chairway to Heaven, Arc en Rève, Bordeaux, 2009. 200 wooden chairs, courtesy of 2012 Architecten

Superuse Studios

  • 2012 Architecten, Chairway to Heaven, Arc en Rève, Bordeaux, 2009. 200 wooden chairs, courtesy of 2012 Architecten

    2012 Architecten, Chairway to Heaven, Arc en Rève, Bordeaux, 2009. 200 wooden chairs, courtesy of 2012 Architecten

Superuse Studios

Superuse Studios has been researching the city as an ecosystem since 1997. The architects have a unique perspective, with Recyclicity and Superuse as their aim. Superuse Studios sees the building and construction process as a cycle, and makes objects that reduce their impact on the environment. In this way they do research into more efficient ways to reuse: not recycling, but Superuse. And with their ‘cyclifiers’ they try to make ‘shortcircuits’ in energy and material flows, for example. This makes it possible to make more efficient use of input and output flows: something they call Recyclicity.

Yes Naturally asked Superuse Studios to design the museumshop, observation posts and the bridge that gives entrance to the dunes. transitions between the indoor and outdoor spaces of the GEM, the Fotomuseum and the gardens and pond. The architects begin the process by making a ‘harvest chart’ of the Hague area. This chart brings into view the different flows of building materials in the area surrounding the Gemeentemuseum and is available to all of the Yes Naturally artists. Click here for more information about the architects.

9.1

Heath Bunting

  • Heath Bunting, The Status Project, 2004-2014 floor mapping, variable dimensions,

    Heath Bunting, The Status Project, 2004-2014 floor mapping, variable dimensions,

Heath Bunting

Heath Bunting is a media artist with a background as a hacker. Bunting aims to make existing systems more democratic. A well-known project of his is BorderXing Guide, available on the web, in which he reports on how he crosses borders in a very personalized way without the involvement of border control or immigration officials. In order to get full access to the Guide on the website, you first have to travel to an indicated place. For Yes Naturally Bunting has something special in the planning.

He is working on the Status Project and is further developing this project for the Yes Naturally exhibition. The Status Project aims to identify and describe the systems in which people find themselves and in which their identities are formed.

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Marjetica Potrč / OOZE

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Marjetica Potrč / OOZE

Culture and nature are intrinsically bound in the projects of the Slovenian artist Marjetica Potrč. She explores, often with local residents and other stakeholders, what a shared life culture involves. With her work Potrč tries to come up with practical solutions to local and often complex problems surrounding living and residence, issues having to do with self-reliance and property ownership, and the involvement of local communities.

Her project for Yes Naturally is called ‘The Commons’ and is set in a wood in the dunes behind the GEM. Along with Ooze Architecten she creates a wooden platform that will be an important spot during the exhibition. Depending on the interests of the local residents, an agenda will be made consisting of discussion, talks and workshops. While the most important aim is that the local residents get to know each other, ‘The Commons’ platform will also be used for other interesting activities. With his ‘Küche der Armen’ Sjim Hendrix brings a special menu to Yes Naturally at The Commons; The Commons will serve as a gathering place for the many volunteers working with Yes Naturally and as a starting point for some of the tours.

The Commons is an initiative of Marjetica Potrc and Ooze (Eva Pfannes and Sylvain Hartenberg) in collaboration with curator Theo Tegelaers (TAAK), Henriette Waal and Christiaan Bakker (Sandberg Instituut/Master Vacant NL), and the assitance of Lucia Babina and Sven van Asten in the frame of the art event Ja Natuurlijk (15th of March / 31st of August 2013)

Minerva Cuevas, 2013, collection of the artist

Minerva Cuevas

  • Minerva Cuevas, 2013, collection of the artist

    Minerva Cuevas, 2013, collection of the artist

Minerva Cuevas

Minerva Cuevas is a Mexican artist. Her work is politically engaged and couples social and economic justice. Cuevas is making an artwork for Yes Naturally that is a continuation of research she did in Sweden. During her time of residence in Lund the Swedish postal system was privatised and Cuevas was unpleasantly shocked that all of the mailboxes and post offices also disappeared. She coupled the ‘extinction’ of a public service like the postal service with the extinction of animal species. She deepens her investigation for Yes Naturally and applies it to the Dutch situation of privatisation of services that were once public.

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Sjim Hendrix

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Sjim Hendrix

Sjim Hendrix is a critical artist, chef and food idealist. A green sauce to cover over real problems doesn’t do it for him. The thread running through his work is eating and the tension between poverty and decadence. For him poverty is not just about money; there’s also poverty in taste. He takes this fact literally. For Yes Naturally Hendrix works together with the chef of GEMber to make a Yes Naturally menu and creates his own ‘Küche der Armen’ in wich he prepares a seven course diner consisting of gastronomic wonders, serving food we generally reject as inedible, from pig ears, ant eggs and parakeet to dandelion and caramelized milk skins.

Photo by Benjamin Tillig. Courtesy of Kölner Verkehrsbetriebe and Johann König, Berlin

Tue Greenfort

  • Installation view: Underground station Breslauer Platz, Cologne

    Installation view: Underground station Breslauer Platz, Cologne

Tue Greenfort

Tue Greenfort criticizes corporate and academic ‘greenwashing’ practices. He tries to tackle the source of our ecological imbalance and to devise long term solutions. Greenfort is inspired by the work of Donna Haraway, whose work provides the basis for his design of Worldy House, an Archive. In this house texts written by artists and theoreticians can be read that express the refreshing idea that nature and culture are mutually interconnected. The dominant notion of separation between object and subject is put in another perspective and called into question. The Worldy House was also part of dOCUMENTA13.

Another of Greenfort’s projects is Neobiota. Using modern surveillance techniques Greenfort followed tropical birds residing in the parks of Cologne, Germany. In a very visual way Greenfort explores the question of when we consider a fellow creature as a native or as an intruder in our habitat. At the same time he also calls into question the extensive presence of surveillance cameras in contemporary society.

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Zeger Reyers

  • Zeger Reyers, A Glance Through The Shades (working title), 2013, collection of the artist

    Zeger Reyers, A Glance Through The Shades (working title), 2013, collection of the artist

Zeger Reyers

The artworks of Zeger Reyers employ materials until their molecules. You can see and hear his pieces, and often also taste and smell them. Natural processes always play a vital role. As in his project Mosselstoel (2000), for example, where for two years he let mussels grow on a chair, which he then steamed in a super-sized pan and served in the museum.Or when he filled one of the rooms in the GEM with water and then released black fish to swim around in the dark water (Aqua Boogie, 2004). As an observer, you’re always surprised by the originality of his projects, leading you to re-evaluate set concepts.

Zeger Reyers’ work for Yes Naturally is called A Glance Through the Shades. He had special blinds made for one of the GEM windows so that during the exhibition a particular mushroom sort can grow on them, the Stropharia cubensis. The museum’s climate control will cause these ‘magic mushrooms’ to quickly dry out, making them less innocent than they at first seemed …

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Sjaak Langenberg

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Sjaak Langenberg

Egocentrism and anthropocentrism run rampant on Facebook and Twitter. Humans think they are in charge, but in fact the roles are frequently reversed. A mosquito, for instance, managed to shut down the news in Taiwan by flying into the throat of a television news presenter. Another mosquito gave away a Finnish car thief by gorging itself with his blood.
In the average human mouth there are more than 7 billion bacteria. Isn’t it time to let them speak? In an effort to put human mastery of the world in perspective and to promote a more symbiotic relationship among humans, animals and things, Sjaak Langenberg has invited 16 biologists, philosophers and authors to crawl into the skin of a godwit, a vacuum cleaner, Paulus Potter’s bull, a mosquito, a slug, the rhinovirus, the primordial plant species Twoleavescannotdie and other creatures. Each writer crawls into the skin of a bacterium or plant on the Facebook and Twitter page of Fora & Fauna for two weeks and looks at the world, or comments on the news, from this unusual position. Follow it all here or on Facebook and Twitter!